Soap Aloe

by Jada Urban

Soap Aloe (genus species) is highly adaptable and is naturally found in a wide range of habitats across Southern Africa. Soap Aloe is very resistant to drought and very tolerant to high salt content. Throughout much of the summer, soap aloe sends up a purplish branched stalk about 2 ft. tall, showing yellow, orange or red flowers.

Soap Aloe also known as produces stemless leaves in a rosette. The leaves are thick and succulent with thick points and coarsely toothed margins. They are dark green (sometimes with a reddish tinge) with distinctive white spots. Soap Aloe has tubular flowers that usually grow to be coral-red in color in this color form.

(Reynolds, Tom. 2004. Aloes.)

 

 

Distribution and Habitat

South Africa, Botswana and Zimbabwe. – make into a paragraph. Include habitat and a map that shows all areas where it is distributed.

 

 

Culinary, Medicinal and Cosmetic Uses

Its name is derived from the fact that the sap from its thick, fleshy leaves can be used as a soap substitute because the sap leaves soap suds. .edible – give recipes. cosmetic – lotion, great for sunburn, etc – need more info on uses in Africa

Landscaping
Soap Aloe is an excellent addition to the landscape because it uses very little water, and the nectar from the flowers attracts butterflies, hummingbirds and other pollinators. perfect for rock or cactus gardens (xeriscape). Get a picture of a landscaped area at SFHardiness (USDA Zones 8B Moisture Although the tips of the leaves may wither and curl during hot, dry periods. Supplemental watering will keep the leaves plump and healthy.- 11) Soap aloe is damaged in hard freezes, but recovers quickly.

Paragraph about Hummingbirds and pollinators are attracted to the showy flowers. and butterflies

 

 

 

 

You tube videos?

Sources

format properly. Wikipedia and daves garden are not a scholarly sources. Look up UF EDIS website Need the sources for all images

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aloe_maculata

http://www.floridata.com/ref/a/aloe_sap.cfm

http://ag.arizona.edu/pima/gardening/aridplants/Aloe_saponaria.html

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/54452/#b